Sexcam a robot

While living in New York, I started to became aware that we were constantly under surveillance; I was being watched by security cameras, asked to show my ID to get into a building, etc.The pervasiveness of surveillance made anonymity more desirable.I think women of my generation were raised to believe that we can have it all, but that theory had never really been tested, our mothers gave us something impossible.At the same time, I was playing with materiality and preconceived notions of perfection within my own work. I never wanted to be responsible for feminism, yet this particular notion made sense and I want to have the poetic liberty to give that away to someone else who really wants it.Now that the long, idle Summer hiatus in which i published roughly 0.7 posts per week is over, it’s back to business as usual and i’m glad that Addie Wagenknecht has accepted to be the first artist i interview for the the new ‘season’. While reading the description of The Optimization of Parenthood (Part 1 and Part 2), i realized that i almost never encounter artworks dealing with parenthood in media art.

We provided 1,200 museum attendees with limited edition, wearable black bars that allow for preemptive non-disclosure.

I think we are reaching a point if we haven’t already where anonymity is imperative to creativity.

The performance in Vienna was all about encouraging people to openly claim anonymity, as a public statement.

Surveillance has become so ubiquitous its become comfortable. We have become such a surveillance saturated society, in some regards we expect it.

Anonymity is becoming a solution for some to protect destabilized identities, revolutionaries, and hackers. Mask in public spaces are beginning to be outlawed.

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