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In each case, the stereotypes being perceived are never about the individual, but a projected expectation based on media portrayals and other falsehoods. When you perceive someone as "less masculine," "hyper-masculine," "uneducated," or god-fucking-forbid "probably hostile toward the USA, Jesus, and Freedom™" based on whatever race they happened to be born, it doesn't matter what that person does or is; you've already put them into a category full of awful assumptions and they can never win.

Race Fetishization From Puccini's Madama Butterfly to Miley's cornrows, pop culture's worship of the exotic is as ubiquitous as it is downright creepy. I like clear, direct communication.) "I like pretty Chinese women." (Sorry, buddy... The best they can hope for is to become "the exception" to your racist rule. It fundamentally lacks empathy, it debases people, and it's astoundingly wrong. Well, for starters, we can stop rationalizing our racism as a legitimate preference and realize that if we take the time to look for it, we may find something worthwhile, fascinating and beautiful about virtually every human being on the planet.

Long before "White Privilege" was a Macklemore song, it was (and continues to be) a social reality with tendrils extending into virtually all facets of our society.

Some of its manifestations are a matter of life and death; others are subtle annoyances known as "microaggressions" which can build up and contribute to a general sense of not feeling safe or comfortable in a world that was never designed with us in mind.

And yet, can you really blame marginalized people for seeking out safety and comfort?

In 2009, Ok Cupid released a "Race Report." According to their heteronormative data, women using their site "penalized" (their word) Asian and black men.

Photo: courtesy Siren." width="640" height="502" srcset="https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2016/01/1183w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2016/01/Siren-300x235300w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2016/01/Siren-1024x8021024w" sizes="(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px" / There are plenty of dating apps that aim to hand the reins to women, but now there’s even one that was designed by a female artist.

Siren, named for the mythical beauties who lured sailors to shipwreck on rocky shores, was founded by Seattle artist Susie J.

(Funny enough, at the time, the tech-savvy artist had had the smart phone for only one year.) Internet dating has proven a fruitful topic for other artists, such as Tully Arnot, who created a Tinder-swiping robot, and Anna Gensler, who eviscerated rude Tinder matches in unflattering portraits.There’s even a Grindr-esque app that pairs performance artists with audiences.Before getting an MFA from the University of Washington, Lee earned a bachelor’s degree in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale and a master’s in science education from Columbia.We're talking about perceptual junk that gets in the way of seeing another person as an individual worthy of the same respect we would hope others would give us. There are few things unsexier than being told that you must not a valid ethnic person because you don't know how to do the thing that white people saw someone do in that one TV show. Microaggressions are real, and it's no one's job to pretend you're not a clueless boob when you persist in acting like one.) Race Devaluation I wish this wasn't even a thing to have to talk about, but race devaluation is the ugly, ugly flipside of race fetishization.Here are some common ways that racial bias in online dating is experienced by people of color. And then when you respond with a flattened, "Nope," often the well-intended responses are: "Why are you so sensitive? Photo-based dating apps, paired with implicit bias, have the unfortunate consequence of really reinforcing toxic and pervasive stereotypes that undermine individual dignity.

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